Aluminum Caprate
Aluminum Palmitate
P-Aminobenzoic acid
Bebzakdegtde
Benzyl Acetoacetate
Benzyl Benzoate
Benzyl Butyrate
Benzyl Cinnamate
Benzyl Formate
Calcium Ascorbate
Calcium Bromate
Calcium Caprate
Calcium Caprylate
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium Citrate
Calcium Diglutamate
Calcium Gluconate
Calcium Lactate
Calcium Myristate
Calcium Palmitate
Calcium Pantothenate
D-Camphor
Carboxymethyl cellulose
Cellulose Acetate
Chlorophyll
Citronellal
DL-Citronellol
Citronellyl Acetates
Citronellyl Butyrate
Diethyl Malate
Diethyl Tartrate
Disodium Citriate
Erythorbic Acid
Ethyl Acetate
Neryl Acetate
Neryl Butyrate
Neryl Formate
Ethyl Vanillin
Ethtyl Vanillin Isobutyrate
Ethyl Vanillin Beta-D-Glucopyranoside
Ethyl Vanillin Propyleneglycol Acetal
Ferric Citrate
Ferrous Ascorbate
Ferrous Citrate
Ferrous Fumarate
Ferrous Lactate
Ferrous Gluconate
Geranyl Formate
Lactalbumin
Lanolin
Lauric Acid
Lauryl Acetate
Lauryl Alcohol
Linalyl Acetate
Linalyl Anthranilate
Linalyl Formate
Magnesium Caprate
Magnesium Caprylate
Magnesium Fumarate
Manganese Citrate
Musk, Ketone
Myristic Acid
Sodium Ascorbate
Sodium Benzoate
Sodium Bicarbonate
Sodium Formate
Sodium Fumarate
Sodium Humate
Sodium Lactate
Sodium Tartrate
Tocopherols
Sorbitol
Salicylic Acid
Potassium Sorbate
Potassium Chloride
Potassium Caseinate
Potassium Carbonate
Potassium Caprylate
Potassium Caprate
Beta-Carotene
Potassium Bromate
Potassium Borate
Potassium Bisulfite

 

Alginic acid

(CAS#:9005-32-7)

Recommedn Site:

Alginic acid ( algine , alginate ) is a viscous gum that is abundant in the cell walls of brown algae.

An insoluble colloidal acid in the form of a carboxylated polysaccharide that is abundant in the cell walls of brown algae (especially large kelp and wracks).

Used in jam, jellies and marmalades as defined in Directive 79/693/EEC and other similar fruit spreads including low-calorie products, an ingredient in antacid preparations (Gaviscon, Bisodol tablets, Asilone tablets Boots own etc) kelp is also available in tablet form as a dietary supplement.

Found in seaweed fertilizer preparations (approved by DEFRA's organic food standards but not by the Soil Association)

Structure
Chemically, it is a linear copolymer with homopolymeric blocks of (1-4)-linked ?-D-mannuronate (M) and its C-5 epimer -L-guluronate (G) residues, respectively, covalently linked together in different sequences or blocks.

The monomers can appear in homopolymeric blocks of consecutive G-residues (G-blocks), consecutive M-residues (M-blocks), alternating M and G-residues (MG-blocks) or randomly organized blocks. The relative amount of each block type varies both with the origin of the alginate. Alternating blocks form the most flexible chains and are more soluble at lower pH than the other blocks. G-blocks form stiff chain elements, and two G-blocks of more than 6 residues each form stable cross-linked junctions with divalent cations (e.g. Ca2+, Ba2+, Sr2+ among others) leading to a three-dimensional gel network. At low pH, protonized alginates will form acidic gels. In these gels, it is mostly the homopolymeric blocks that form the junctions, where the stability of the gel is determined by the relative content of G-blocks.

Forms
Commercial varieties of alginate are extracted from seaweed, including the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, Ascophyllum Nodosum and various types of Laminaria.

Alginate absorbs water quickly, which makes it useful as an additive in dehydrated products such as slimming aids, and in the manufacture of paper and textiles. It is also used for waterproofing and fireproofing fabrics, for thickening drinks, ice cream and cosmetics, and as a detoxifier that can absorb poisonous metals from the blood. Alginate is also produced by certain bacteria, notably Azotobacter species. Attempts to produce bacterial alginate have not yet been commercially successful.

Alginate ranges from white to yellowish brown, and takes filamentous, grainy, granular, and powdered forms. It is insoluble in water and organic solvents, and dissolves slowly in basic solutions of sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide and trisodium phosphate.

Uses
Purified forms of alginate are used in antacid preparations such as Gaviscon?, Bisodol?, Asilone?, and Boots Own? tablets. Alginate is used extensivly as a mold-making material in dentistry and prosthetics, and in textiles. It is also used in the food industry, for thickening soups and jellies. Calcium alginate is used in burn dressings that promote healing and can be removed painlessly.